Trucker CB Codes & Channels Translated

Semi Truck Driver CB Radio

Here’s you complete Guide to CB Radio Codes that can help you understand what truckers may be saying and these will also help you understand what other emergency personnel may be stating.  At times these codes may sound off faster than fireworks.  However, it’s always nice to at least understand something.

CB Radio stands for “Citizens Band Radio”. Its just easier to say CB Radio. Throughout the world, the majority of people know this device only as a CB Radio. Everyone from citizens, to government officials use CB Radios. Some have their own private codes while others have codes in pamphlets and handbooks.

Below is a mixture of the most commonly used CB Radio Codes. Some of these codes may be unpopular in today’s era, but they’re the best fit for that particular code to make this list complete.

The CB Codes Translated

10 / 1          Poorly received

10 / 2         Received

10 / 3         Stop Transmitting

10 / 4         Message confirmed

10 / 5        Please relay current message

10 / 6        Standby

10 / 7        Leaving Air or Out of Service

10 / 8        Subject to a call or In Service

10 / 9        Please repeat message

10 / 10     Transmission completed, standing by.

10 / 11       You are talking to fast.

10 / 12       Visitors Near

10 / 13       Please advise any weather or road conditions

10 / 14       Message or Information

10 / 15       Message delivered

10 / 16       Make a pickup at (location provided)

10 / 17       Urgent disturbance

10 / 18       Urgent or Priority

10 / 19       Return to (location provided)

10 / 20      Location

10 / 21       Call by phone

10 / 22       Reporting in person to (____).

10 / 23       Stand by (to wait)

10 / 24       Previous assignment completed.

10 / 25       Please contact (_____).

10 / 26       Cancel previous message / ignore previous statement / etc.

10 / 27       Am relocating to channel (___).

10 / 28      Identify your station.

10 / 29       Time is up for your contact (individual you are speaking to).

10 / 30       Does not comply with FCC rules.

10 / 31        Crime in progress.

10 / 32       I am providing you with a radio check.

10 / 33       Emergency traffic at this station.

10 / 34       Trouble at this station, help is needed.

10 / 35       Secret Information (Confidential)

10 / 36       The correct time is (____).

10 / 37        Suspicious vehicle, identify self.

10 / 38       Ambulance is needed at (____).

10 / 39       Your message was delivered.

10 / 40      Run Silent, try not to be spotted.

10 / 41       Please tune to channel (____).

10 / 42       Traffic accident located at (____).

10 / 43       Traffic tied – up at (____).

10 / 44       I have a message for you.

10 / 45       All units that can hear this message, please respond / report.

10 / 46       Motorist assisting.

10 / 47       Emergency road repair.

10 / 48       Traffic control, use caution.

10 / 49       Traffic light out, use caution.

10 / 50       Break Channel

10 / 51       Wrecker Needed

10 / 52       Ambulance Needed

10 / 53       Road Blocked

10 / 54       Animals on Roadway

10 / 55       Driver Intoxicated

10 / 56       Intoxicated Pedestrian

10 / 57       Hit and Run Accident

10 / 58       Direct Traffic

10 / 59       Convoy or Escort

10 / 60       Squad Car In Vicinity

10 / 61       Personnel In Vicinity

10 / 62       Unable To Respond, Use Phone

10 / 63       Local Message

10 / 64       Prepare To Copy Message (Take notes)

10 / 65       Net Message Assignment

10 / 66       Message Cancellation

10 / 67       Clear To Enable to Read Net Message

10 / 68       Dispatch Information

10 / 69       Dispatched Information Received

10 / 70       Fire

10 / 71       Fire Of Adverse Nature

10 / 72       Report Fire Progress

10 / 73       Report Smoke Conditions

10 / 74       Negative (A response resembling the phrase NO)

10 / 75       Am In Contact With (_____).

10 / 76       En Route To (_____).

10 / 77       Estimated Time Of Arrival (ETA) (_____).

10 / 78       Request Fire Assistance

10 / 79       Notify Coroner (To be done via phone when possible).

10 / 80       Chase In Progress

10 / 81       Officer (_____) Will Be At Your (_____) Station.

10 / 82       Reserve Lodging

10 / 83       Tell Officer (_____) To Call This Station.

10 / 84       Please Advice ETA If Meeting At (_____).

10 / 85       Am (_____) Minutes Late.

10 / 86       Officer (_____) Left This Station At (_____) Headed To (_____).

10 / 87       Please Pick Up Checks For Distribution For Station (_____).

10 / 88       Please Confirm Current Telephone Number Of (_____) Is Correct.

10 / 89       Bomb Threat

10 / 90       Alarm (_____). (Type of alarm.)

10 / 91       Please Pick Up Prisoner (_____).

10 / 92       Complaint About Parking.

10 / 93       Blockade.

10 / 94       Drag Racers.

10 / 95       Prisoner In Custody.

10 / 96       Mental Subject.

10 / 97       Please Check Traffic Signal.

10 / 98       Jail / Prison Break.

10 / 99       Wanted / Stolen Indicated In Records.

10 / 100     Must Use Restroom.

10 / 200     Police Needed At (_____) Immediately.  (Location, place, etc.)

Please take into account, that using the above 10 Codes for a purpose to obscure the transmission’s meaning (transmission is the sending or receiving of a message) could be illegal in some countries.  The purpose of the above 10 Codes is to make communication not only more efficient, but to help free up the airwaves so that others can also communicate.

These Codes originated in the United States and are mostly used in English speaking countries.  Though depending on where you live, the dialect that is spoken, could somewhat change the verbiage used per 10 Code.  So this could slightly change in meaning because of a dialect difference.  Just something to keep in mind.

 

What Are The Common CB Radio Channels Truckers Use?

Channel 1       Used somewhat in the eastern parts of The United States of America an maybe bordering areas of Canada.

Channel 4       Used mostly by those with 4×4’s while off-roading or something of the like.

Channel 6       Used mostly those that have large CB Radio Set – Ups who’s signal can reach a 1,000 miles or more.

Channel 9       A channel used to communicate with emergency personnel for needing assistance.

Channel 10     Used mostly in various regional areas.

Channel 13      Used mostly by those traveling in RV’s and on Watercraft.

Channel 14      Mostly used within the communications of walkie – talkies.

Channel 17      Used mostly on the West Coast of The United States of America and maybe the bordering areas of Canada.

Channel 19      Used throughout The United States of America as the main focal point for communication between truckers.

The CB Codes Translated

Here’s some CB Radio Codes that can help you understand what truckers may be saying and these will also help you understand what other emergency personnel may be stating.  At times these codes may sound off faster than fireworks.  However, it’s always nice to at least understand something.

10 / 1          Poorly received

10 / 2         Received

10 / 3         Stop Transmitting

10 / 4         Message confirmed

10 / 5        Please relay current message

10 / 6        Standby

10 / 7        Leaving Air or Out of Service

10 / 8        Subject to a call or In Service

10 / 9        Please repeat the message

10 / 10     Transmission completed, standing by.

10 / 11       You are talking too fast.

10 / 12       Visitors Near

10 / 13       Please advise any weather or road conditions

10 / 14       Message or Information

10 / 15       Message delivered

10 / 16       Make a pickup at (location provided)

10 / 17       Urgent disturbance

10 / 18       Urgent or Priority

10 / 19       Return to (location provided)

10 / 20      Location

10 / 21       Call by phone

10 / 22       Reporting in person to (____).

10 / 23       Stand by (to wait)

10 / 24       Previous assignment completed.

10 / 25       Please contact (_____).

10 / 26       Cancel previous message / ignore previous statement / etc.

10 / 27       Am relocating to channel (___).

10 / 28      Identify your station.

10 / 29       Time is up for your contact (the individual you are speaking to).

10 / 30       Does not comply with FCC rules.

10 / 31        Crime in progress.

10 / 32       I am providing you with a radio check.

10 / 33       Emergency traffic at this station.

10 / 34       Trouble at this station, help is needed.

10 / 35       Secret Information (Confidential)

10 / 36       The correct time is (____).

10 / 37        Suspicious vehicle, identify self.

10 / 38       Ambulance is needed at (____).

10 / 39       Your message was delivered.

10 / 40      Run Silent, try not to be spotted.

10 / 41       Please tune to channel (____).

10 / 42       Traffic accident located at (____).

10 / 43       Traffic tied – up at (____).

10 / 44       I have a message for you.

10 / 45       All units that can hear this message, please respond/report.

10 / 46       Motorist assisting.

10 / 47       Emergency road repair.

10 / 48       Traffic control, use caution.

10 / 49       Traffic light out, use caution.

10 / 50       Break Channel

10 / 51       Wrecker Needed

10 / 52       Ambulance Needed

10 / 53       Road Blocked

10 / 54       Animals on Roadway

10 / 55       Driver Intoxicated

10 / 56       Intoxicated Pedestrian

10 / 57       Hit and Run Accident

10 / 58       Direct Traffic

10 / 59       Convoy or Escort

10 / 60       Squad Car In Vicinity

10 / 61       Personnel In Vicinity

10 / 62       Unable To Respond, Use Phone

10 / 63       Local Message

10 / 64       Prepare To Copy Message (Take notes)

10 / 65       Net Message Assignment

10 / 66       Message Cancellation

10 / 67       Clear To Enable to Read Net Message

10 / 68       Dispatch Information

10 / 69       Dispatched Information Received

10 / 70       Fire

10 / 71       Fire Of Adverse Nature

10 / 72       Report Fire Progress

10 / 73       Report Smoke Conditions

10 / 74       Negative (A response resembling the phrase NO)

10 / 75       Am In Contact With (_____).

10 / 76       En Route To (_____).

10 / 77       Estimated Time Of Arrival (ETA) (_____).

10 / 78       Request Fire Assistance

10 / 79       Notify Coroner (To be done via phone when possible).

10 / 80       Chase In Progress

10 / 81       Officer (_____) Will Be At Your (_____) Station.

10 / 82       Reserve Lodging

10 / 83       Tell Officer (_____) To Call This Station.

10 / 84       Please Advice ETA If Meeting At (_____).

10 / 85       Am (_____) Minutes Late.

10 / 86       Officer (_____) Left This Station At (_____) Headed To (_____).

10 / 87       Please Pick Up Checks For Distribution For Station (_____).

10 / 88       Please Confirm Current Telephone Number Of (_____) Is Correct.

10 / 89       Bomb Threat

10 / 90       Alarm (_____). (Type of alarm.)

10 / 91       Please Pick Up Prisoner (_____).

10 / 92       Complaint About Parking.

10 / 93       Blockade.

10 / 94       Drag Racers.

10 / 95       Prisoner In Custody.

10 / 96       Mental Subject.

10 / 97       Please Check Traffic Signal.

10 / 98       Jail / Prison Break.

10 / 99       Wanted / Stolen Indicated In Records.

10 / 100     Must Use Restroom.

10 / 200     Police Needed At (_____) Immediately.  (Location, place, etc.)

Please take into account, that using the above 10 Codes for a purpose to obscure the transmission’s meaning (transmission is the sending or receiving of a message) could be illegal in some countries.  The purpose of the above 10 Codes is to make communication not only more efficient but to help free up the airwaves so that others can also communicate.

These Codes originated in the United States and are mostly used in English speaking countries.  Though depending on where you live, the dialect that is spoken could somewhat change the verbiage used per 10 Code.  So this could slightly change in meaning because of a dialect difference.  Just something to keep in mind.

What Are The Common CB Radio Channels Truckers Use?

Channel 1       Used somewhat in the eastern parts of The United States of America an maybe bordering areas of Canada.

Channel 4       Used mostly by those with 4×4’s while off-roading or something of the like.

Channel 6       Used mostly by those that have large CB Radio Set – Ups who’s signal can reach a 1,000 miles or more.

Channel 9       A channel used to communicate with emergency personnel for needing assistance.

Channel 10     Used mostly in various regional areas.

Channel 13      Used mostly by those traveling in RV’s and on Watercraft.

Channel 14      Mostly used within the communications of walkie – talkies.

Channel 17      Used mostly on the West Coast of The United States of America and maybe the bordering areas of Canada.

Channel 19      Used throughout The United States of America as the main focal point for communication between truckers.

In some cases depending on the type of radio you choose to use. You may be required to obtain a license. If you choose to use a CB that is 4 watts or less then you are free and clear of any fines. Now when your Citizen Band (CB) Radio is more than 4 watts, you must obtain a license from the FCC. Oh, by the way, this fine starts at around $4,000 – $5,000 and some have been fined as high as $15,000.00.

 

 

About Michael : Semi Truck Driver

I have been a semi truck driver for approximately 20 years. Throughout this time I have been taught a lot of different things from a lot of different people through the years. I've also learned a lot of things from my own mistakes. With all of this in mind, allow me to share with you what I have been lucky enough to learn.

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